In the Beginning: God, Adam, and You

Grand Rapids, MI
March 15-17, 2013
Philadelphia, PA
April 19-21, 2013
Register Now! Register Now!

Over the past few years, numerous denominations have seen the doctrine of the historicity of Adam challenged. While such challenges are not new, what is disturbingly new is that these challenges are coming from fellow evangelicals, from those who are supposed to uphold the inerrancy of Scripture. Register now to attend to important conference.

The theme of this year’s Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology is In the Beginning: God, Adam, and You. Join us as we address the challenges posed to the traditional Christian doctrines of creation and, more specifically, the historicity of Adam.

Due to the supposed irrefutable scientific evidence that man has evolved from lower life forms and was not the product of God’s special creation, even those within the Reformed church are calling for a reshaping of how people think about the historicity of Adam. Some have gone so far as to say that Christians should abandon our conviction that Adam was a real individual. Others have tried to be subtler, seeking a mediating position. One thing on which all of the opponents of the traditional teaching are agreed is that it is simply wrong to believe what the Bible says concerning the real, historical existence of Adam.

Come learn why the questions being raised are neither light nor harmless. Moreover, they are not new questions. But each generation is called upon to defend the great truths of the Bible. The PCRT was founded to respond to such compromised teaching. In the same spirit, PCRT 2013 will respond to these harmful and serious questions, which constitute an assault on the very foundations of our faith.

This is an important conference. The issues addressed will continue to affect the Church for decades to come. Join us in 2013 as we issue a clarion call to the Church to raise high the banner of faithfulness to God’s Word, as we have done since 1974.

We are proud to have you stand with us as we seek not the world’s approval but what is all important and what has driven the ministry of the PCRT and its founder: faithfulness to God’s inerrant Word, “in season and out of season” (2 Tim 4:2).
 

Grand Rapids, MI
March 15-17, 2013
Philadelphia, PA
April 19-21, 2013
Register Now! Register Now!

The Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology - 40 years

Post  tebebras lux - "After darkness, light." This was the motto of the sixteenth century Protestant Reformation. The Dark Ages (the longest period of Christian unity in church history) had placed a bushel over doctrines of grace, obscuring the Gospel itself by a sacerdotal substitution of infused grace that provoked reliance upon the Church's ministrations for salvation, rather than upon the full sufficiency of the imputed righteousness of Christ as the meritorious ground of redemption.

The recovery of the Gospel with its elements of justification by grace alone, through faith alone, by Christ alone was the burst of divine glory that vanquished the darkness.

However, in the intervening years since the church recovered the solae (sola Scriptura, sola fide, sola gratia, solus Christus, soli Deo gloria), Protestant Christianity was subjected to the devastating unbelief of nineteenth century Liberalism that swept through Europe and America with a naturalism that captured seminaries, colleges, and entire denominations. The churches in Europe were left empty, with their primary usage changed to museums that marked the culture of a former era in contrast to what is now designated by historians as the Post-Christian Era; and leaving the American Church crippled, divided, and almost entirely secularized.

It was against this backdrop that Dr. James Montgomery Boice envisioned an effort to say "No!" to the encroaching darkness and "Yes!" to a recovery of biblical and historical Christianity. The first PCRT was held in 1974 with the stated purpose: To glorify God through a rediscovery of the Church's great doctrinal foundations.

Who would have thought that [forty] years later, thousands upon thousands of people would have been encouraged in the Reformed faith, not only in Philadelphia but in other cities such as Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Memphis, Toronto, St. Louis, Fort Lauderdale, Grand Rapids, Colorado Springs, Berkeley, Wheaton, and Seattle.

The PCRT lost its founder and leader, but not its vision and mission.

Soli Deo gloria!