Posts by Greg Wilbur


Lord’s Day worship imperceptively reorients our affections towards heaven and away from earthly concerns, towards the eternal rather than those things that are passing away, to the way of the cross instead of our own comfort. The on-going shaping of the Sabbath equips, prepares, challenges, and changes us.


Ambrose brought the singing of hymns to congregational worship and established what became the foundation of Ambrosian Chant. Hymns like “O Splendor of God’s Glory Bright” and “Come, Thou, Redeemer of the Earth” have instructed countless churches throughout the centuries.


This song of comfort and hope would have been particularly consoling during the unrest and uncertainly of the early days of the Reformation. Reminding the people of the truth of the Gospel, the promises of life in death, and the glory of Christ that drives away the darkness of the lands under the shadow of death.


Congregational singing should be corporate—with thought and sensitivity given to participatory songs and vocal parts so that the congregation can actually sing.


Before we borrow too many of the forms and feel of an antithetical aesthetic and bring them into worship, we should first make sure that it fits the purpose of worship in the context of a worship space and the reflected beauty of our transcendent God.