Posts by Jason Helopoulos

 

There has never been a Christian laying on his deathbed wishing that he had never given himself to the Kingdom, or held a little more back from the Kingdom, kept a little more in reserve, been a little less passionate, a little less serious about his faith, a little less concerned about the things of God, a little less time spent with Christ, and a little more selfish, a little more worldy, been a little more invested in a few other things.

 

There is something wonderfully unique about Christian parents. Christian parents seek to maintain a counter-cultural flavor even as we seek to prepare our children for entrance into that culture as fully-functioning adults. They seek to prepare their children for life on earth at the same time as they are seeking to prepare them for life in heaven. Christian parents see their children as a gift given to them and also as a stewardship to be respected. They are "our children" and yet we also recognize that they belong to another--namely to their Heavenly Father. Christian parenting is an odd endeavor and Christian parents are a rare breed.

 

When the disciples asked Jesus to teach them how to pray, He began by teaching them to open their prayers with the words, "Our Father." Surely, Christ could have used other forms of address. He could have taught us to pray, "Our Sovereign," "Our Lord," "Our Creator," or "Our God." But He doesn't. Insteas, He uttered the personal, the relational, the most intimate of names--He taught us to pray to "Our Father." Here are seven reasons why your soul should rattle with delight with the idea that God is your Father.

 

As much as I love a good sporting event, I am also concerned for the average Evangelical Christian and their approach to recreation. As with all things, we want to view recreation through the eyes of faith. Our faith is not a compartmentalized faith. So how do we determine what is appropriate and what is not appropriate recreation? Should a mature Christian watch football?

 

What was lost in the Fall? One could answer life, innocence, righteousness, freedom, or a host of other things, and be correct. Yet none of these garners the label "greatest loss." The greatest loss incurred by the Fall was lost communion with our Creator. But what man lost by sin, God restores by grace. Uninterrupted, unfettered, unadulterated communion with God is the great promise of salvation.